The Show Me the Money SIUC Campus Tour – July 1st

Are you interested in knowing where tuition and fees go to? What state and donor dollars do on campus? Join the Association of Civil Service Employees, the Faculty Association, Graduate Assistants United, and the Non-Tenure Track Faculty Association on Friday July 1st — the first day of SIUC’s fiscal year — for a campus tour entitled “The Show Me The Money SIUC Campus Tour.”

We will gather at the North entrance of Morris Library (in front of the fountain) at 12 pm, and proceed to other key locations including Faner Hall, Woody Hall, Anthony Hall, and McAndrews Stadium. At each stop, we’ll have a brief presentation/discussion about what each place reveals about SIUC’s fiscal priorities and what we see as a consistent de-prioritizing of quality education. We anticipate that the entire tour will take approximately 45 minutes. To introduce a playful element to this action, we’re encouraging people to dress as tourists, so please wear your bermuda hats and tropical shirts (and bring your camera along, too!). We’ll also be circulating our own satirical version of a campus map.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “The Show Me the Money SIUC Campus Tour – July 1st

  1. Greetings! I am a SIUC faculty member and an NTT dues paying member. I appreciate everything my union has done for me, so please read my following comments in that light. In a wider community sense “show me the money” means something very serious. There are countless doctors, hospitals, businesses and contractors who are owed money by the state. The other day my physician’s office told me they have to wait 47 weeks to get paid by the state contracted health plan. Illinois also owes SIUC nearly 100 million dollars. What are the unions doing about this? Are you concerned the state is such dire financial condition it is hurting the people in this community? No doubt SIUC has skewed financial priorities, but how can the unions say the university has a great deal more money than it says it does? The fact that your neighbors and friends are waiting nearly a year to be paid blows up that argument. It’s a fact- the state is broke and owes SIUC millions and that affects the university’s financial health. Unless you begin to factor that into your message to the greater community , the folks out there are not going to take you seriously.
    Eileen Waldron

    • Hello Eileen; thank you very much for your comment!

      I understand your concerns. Money is a key problem for the university, for the region, for the state, and even nationally and we will do our best to address a lot of the points you make about state funding. The purpose of what we’re doing here, though, is to try and highlight not so much how much or how little SIUC has but rather what SIUC is doing with that pot of money. Is it going to instruction? Is it going to pay quality employees, like yourself, who carry out the university’s mission with its students? Is it going to reinforce failing buildings? As a student, personally I’d like to see some of the money I’m giving the university go to actually putting books in the library where they belong. That’s what “Show Me The Money” is about — tracking where the money we have is going and then asking people to judge if they think those places are the right ones for the university, its employees, and its students.

      As far as the state funding question goes, we are actually doing our bit to help out in Springfield, both personally (through lobbying and talking to our local legislators such as Representative Bost and Senator Luechtefeld) and organizationally. That’s the benefit to being a union member! Part of the larger IEA organization is devoted to being in Springfield and addressing the legislature as a whole. The IEA has a full-time lobbyist dedicated to higher education specifically within their Government Relations team and they are putting pressure on the politicians to do the right thing as an organization just like we do as individuals.

  2. Pingback: News in the DE « SIUC Unions United

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s